KENTE WEAVING

KENTE WEAVING - Developed around 17th century A.D by the people of Asanti the Kingdom, Kente is a colorful Ghanaian traditional fabric that is worn generally on important ceremonies, festivals among other sacred occasions. One of the most popular indigenous cloths of Ghana, Kente cloth is famous for its multicolored and geometric designs. The history of Kente weaving in Ghana extends back more than 400 years. Add to that, there are numerous types of Kente each with its own symbolism and name that tells the culture, history and the social practice of the weavers of the cloth. Moreover, the village of Bonwire is popular for Kente weaving in Ghana and is located 20 Km east of Kumasi. In addition to being the leading Kente weaving center in Ghana, the community's Kente shops as well as weavers are a tourist attraction. Not to mention the fact that you can find a plethora of stores selling African Kente cloth. There are generally five Kente weave patterns namely, Adwin, Nkyeretire or Nkyereano, Faprenu, Ahwepan or Hweepan and Akyem, on which the various diverse and intricate patterns originate. Add to that, there are around 50 types of Kente patterns with most expensive and renowned of all the patterns in the Asanti culture being Adwene asa, which means the skills of the artist have been exhausted.

Kente is woven on ancient hand looms and the weaver operates the loom with their hands and feet. Also known as Kete, Kente cloth is also the national dress of Ghana and is classified as a national treasure.